Browsing Tag

graffiti

Ten Thousand Days

The Power of Words

June 14, 2016
Photo by Jamie Street. Words by unknown graffiti writers

Photo by Jamie Street. Words by unknown graffiti writers

Gratitude, Joy, Oneness and Service (Day 663 – Day 668)

On Sunday, I was wrapped up in my own world.  I didn’t see the news until late in the evening.  I had things to do for my upcoming move, and the only time I had for Facebook was to deal with a difficult decision to ban someone from a memorial group who could not stop himself from attacking another member.  I know that anger masks deep pain, and so it was a difficult decision to exclude someone when I advocate working with Oneness. But no pain justifies continuously acting out on another person.  Without seeking to understand, he would lash out and, like children in a schoolyard, others would join in the cyber-bullying with a barrage of words.  When did we stop listening to one another, and engaging in dialogue? When did we start becoming so incensed by different opinions?

I was exhausted and I just needed a break.  I decided to take a trip to South London, on a mission to give an energetic ‘au revoir’ to a London friend, who isn’t here to do it in person.

He is the artist of one of my favourite pieces of street art that was tagged immediately after it was painted.  When I first went to photograph it, right across the face of the character was scrawled in black paint: “Gay.”

I have always been drawn to words on walls and they have the power to offer an alternative perspective that seldom gets expression, and to remind us that there are other ways of being. Lately, there has been a lot of tagging of streetart in London, by graffiti writers.  But this tag hurt me, because it wasn’t a staking of territory or a protest against gentrification – which are a part of the street art/graff/community dialogue.  No, this was HATEFUL.

The sexuality of the artist, the shop owner and the property owner are not something I know. If I don’t know, then it is likely that the graff didn’t know.  Most likely, this was not an overt personal attack directed at someone believed to be gay.  But it is still a hateful act.   It reflects a culture that allows words about sexuality to be used in a derogatory manner, as a means of bullying.

This morning I was watching the news as I was doing chores.  A very popular American sitcom came on.  Three times in the first five minutes, I heard characters use the word ‘Gay’ as an insult to their friend’s manhood.  I don’t watch this program, but it hit me in the heart, as I saw how they were hiding behind ‘comedy’ to perpetuate the acceptability of this form of bigotry.  Bigotry and bullying is not righteous, hip, edgy or funny.

Like feminists, the LGBTQ community has made gains in the UK, Canada and now America but backlash ensues, in subtle and not so subtle ways.  Yes, in many countries, the LGBTQ community faces more open hostility than in America, but hidden hostility and backlash is perhaps more difficult to fight because it is so hard to identify, define and achieve consensus.

Perhaps if any good has come of the Orlando murders, it is highlighting the backlash against the LGBTQ community, just as the Montreal Massacre did for feminists in Canada.  Some will try to silence the dialogue and will point to the changes in the law that give rights to the oppressed.  “Stop complaining,” they will say.  We must not be silenced.  In the Montreal Massacre, the attack was characterised as the act of a madman and not the targeted attack of women in a previously ‘male domain’ of engineering science.  I am grateful that in the 27 years since L’École Polytechnique, leaders have learned that mass murder can be the act of a madman and be a targeted hate crime as well.

 

You may wonder what took me to see that particular piece of art, on this particular Sunday, before I knew about the Orlando shootings.  And, I wonder as well.  For months, I have had this draw to go photograph the piece again and because I am leaving, I reasoned it was now, or never.  For some reason, I felt (or maybe just hoped?) that the piece had been cleaned up by one of the artist’s friends.

When I got there, I had to wait a half hour for the shop to close.  As I waited, I had a moment of stillness watching the evening sky as the quality of light changed with the weather.  It was beautiful.

When the shutter finally came down, I saw that although the art had been tagged with a graff’s name, the hateful tag across the face had been removed.  I let out a “Yay!” and explained my delight to the manager.  We admired the piece together for a few moments and commented on the craftsmanship of the details, before he was on his way.  He took my hand and said he hoped we would meet again.  Do not tell me that street art does not bring people together.

It gave me so much joy!  And as I delighted in seeing the piece restored to its glory (save for the graff tag that happens on the street), it started to rain.  And then, it turned to a downpour.  When I lived in India, I celebrated the monsoons, and standing in the downpour in South London, for a moment, I felt that the world was rejoicing along with me, at the sight of one less hateful thing.

I am grateful to the artist, and to all street artists.  These artists infuse our communities with love and light through the beauty of their art.  They are an integral part of creating the new story of Oneness and Life.

Knowing that I’m leaving London and may not see the artist for a very long time, I am grateful that I was able to create a happy memory, re-visiting the piece.  I believe that there are forces that are trying to extinguish the light and love in the world and they not only perpetuate violence, but they also rob the hope and faith-in-humanity of people of good intention.  With this moment a part of my day, I later learned of the horror of Orlando, and I did not despair.  I was able to send Reiki as a service to the victims and their families and, because it felt right to do so, to the artist that had painted that shutter.   I was unable to sleep; I have rarely felt the “pull” of the recipients so strongly as I did that night.  The world needs so much healing.

I know that many people struggle to find meaning at times like this.  I don’t pretend to have any answers, but for me, I have learned that the only way to combat division and bigotry is through Oneness.  Attacking members of a religion who have perverted and selectively edited the words of their Prophet (Peace be upon him) to justify bigotry and murder will itself be a backlash against a whole religion.  It will not end the culture of bigotry. I don’t know what will end bigotry in our world, other than a growing movement of Oneness. But, if there is anything I know, as a crafter of words, it is this: our words have power.

As the ancient yogis told us: thought becomes word and word becomes deed.  If we want less targeted murders, less workplace discrimination, less religious, gender, sexuality and politically based violence, we can begin by observing and altering the language we use, to change the way we think.  We must be mindful of our rhetoric in response to this horrible event.  Together – and only together – we can buff out hate.

 

For what are you grateful, today?

 

Ten Thousand Days

Gratitude, Joy, Oneness and Service (Day 426)

October 19, 2015
Photo: Gabriel Santiago

Photo: Gabriel Santiago

Today feels like a good time to focus on gratitude.

I am grateful for fizzy drinks when my stomach is upset. I think the dodgy noodles with Kit last night was a bad idea.

I am grateful that I had the time, yesterday, to get to Shoreditch to photograph a few pieces. One piece I wanted to capture was gone. I felt sad.  Whenever a beloved piece gets painted over, it feels like the loss of a friend.  I have had a lot of loss this year: a friend’s suicide, two deaths in the family and the expectation of more to come as sickness hovers.  Loss and attachment has been a challenge for me, since my mother got cancer when I was 19.

Street art is becoming a good yogic guru.  When Fanakapan’s balloon animals were painted over, I wanted to cry. And, when I turned the corner to see one of my favourite Plin pieces gone forever, yesterday, I let out an audible gasp that could be heard down the street.

Street art’s temporary nature provides constant and unexpected reminders of the pain of attachment. There are only so many legal walls and it is the nature of the gallery of the street to be ever changing.  It is the ephemeral nature of the art that makes it so vibrant and so precious.  As with love, attachment is the very antithesis of the ethos of street art.   One day, perhaps I will grow tired of pain, and relinquish all attachment.  Until then, I am grateful that street art is my teacher.

That said, it was a joy to find a beautiful pink Plin piece, that is new to me.  I had seen it posted on Instagram, and did a lot of research to finally track it down. The effort to find it makes me treasure it all the more.

Art © Monsu Plin; Photo: Tania D Campbell

My experience of Oneness this week is esoteric and difficult to express.

I have been roaming the streets at night, (jetlag) and I have turned my attention to the graffiti writers lately. In Vancouver, there isn’t a big street art scene, but taggers and graffiti writers exist everywhere.

 

Tag by Plin. Photo by Tania D Campbell.

Tag by Plin. Photo by Tania D Campbell.

I first noticed street art and graffiti with Jim Cummins, when I was about 15, in Vancouver. I was drawn to the words and messages left on the walls.  I am a writer so words attract me.  The words at that time were political, disruptive, and spoke to my own youthful frustration and desperate desire to retain my individuality, my idealism and to somehow make my own mark on the world.  The youthful spirit of social change is different to the middle aged longing for legacy.  Both are a way of leaving our mark, but it is the latter that strikes me as being focussed on the self, not the former.

I followed Jim Cummins’ band and his O.G. crew of street and graffiti artists, but never fully entered their world.  I was busy being reluctantly indoctrinated at University, losing my capacity for independent thought, and my time to devote to writing. I read Thomas Pynchon at University but could only look through the window to “freedom”, as I was dragged into the machinery of testing and parroting other people’s theories.

Like the secret postal system in The Crying of a lot 49, graffiti has it’s own coded, symbolic language.  As far as I understand, this symbolic language is used by graffiti writers to communicate to one another about safety and opportunity, much like the codes of the American traveller in the Great Depression: a secret story of an invisible world that falls between the cracks of society. It is the outsider’s insider language.

I have always felt more kinship with those who may have to pass through the ordinary world in order to earn a living but who really belong to the extraordinary world that exists between the cracks and, for some of us, goes beyond the physical world and into the invisible.

And so, as I sought out areas where the graffiti writers dominate, I touched, (as I do, Plin’s creatures) the secret language of the walls.

Photo: Tania D Campbell

Like an archaeologist, I stood on the doorstep –  on the outside of the outside – running my fingertips across the symbols.  I was comforted to know that the 15 year old girl remains. She has been covered in the rubble of a collapsing empire, this past decade, but she has survived.

 

My service today is to give space on my own ‘wall’  to remember writers of all kinds and from all times.

 

It remains for me only to ask:

 

For what are you grateful, today?

 

 

Art, Art, Articles, Community, Oneness

“Underhand” – Global Community Through Street Art

September 17, 2015

BSMT Space launched a new gallery in Dalston this month, with Underhand, a Street Art exhibition, curated by Greg Key, and drawing from the global community of Street Art.  Artists from Los Angeles, New York, London, Chile, Greece, Norway, France, Poland and the UK are among those represented in the show.

 

Flyer courtesy of BSMT Space, Art and design by The Real Dill

Flyer courtesy of BSMT Space, Art and design by The Real Dill

The Community of Street Art

Street Art, a particular passion of BSMT Space, is very much a global community.  Although associated with vandalism and the gang violence of a few American cities, in the minds of many, the Street Artists represented at BSMT Space are a thoughtful, articulate, sensitive and creative group of individuals.

Academics and lawmakers continue to debate whether Street Art is to be viewed as a crime, or as an art form.  In London, we understand that many legal walls and tunnels exist for the practice of Street Art and graffiti letter writing and so, this magazine leaves aside the legal debate and does not condone or promote illegal activity.  Where illegal painting does occur, (in the absence of any other additional crime), it seems that the marking of a wall entails damage to property, rather than assault to individuals, and so perhaps the punishment might be best aligned with other forms of property damage.

With motives and messages as diverse as the number of individuals, all share a common drive to exercise freedom of thought and freedom of expression at a time when these very freedoms are at risk.  Some may paint illegally; many paint only legal walls  – but all seem to attract the label of “outsider” artists who view the street as a place to reclaim and remake the city, community and society.

Street Art often takes as it’s subject the poor, the homeless, and the marginalised, and reclaims and proclaims the difficult aspects of life that consumer culture represses with a plethora of glossy images of perfection. Street Art often expresses uncomfortable truths.  Within this urban artists’ salon (the street), art works both eschew and comment upon the hierarchical structures of power politics in modern society, including those that exist within the art world, itself.

As outsiders to the mainstream art world, a sense of community and mutual support appears to be a central value of most Street Artists one meets.  Arrive in most towns wanting to paint or paste-up works and the Street Art community will help newcomers find safe and legal spaces for expression.  Far from a closed and self-serving network, Street Artists are often charitable and many walk the talk of local community activism, donating their time and their art to community projects.

As a repository for both our spiritual and shadow selves, Street Art offers a beacon to help us return wholeness to the psyche of the urban communities of mankind.

 

Monsù Plin

The first piece to sell at the opening night was “Self Portrait,” by Los Angeles based artist Monsù Plin.

"Self Portrait" by Monsù Plin; Photo by Tania Campbell

“Self Portrait” by Monsù Plin; Photo by Tania Campbell

 

Similar in style to the characters painted by Plin on the streets, the piece draws upon a global art history with hints of expressionism, cubism and the indigenous and folk art of Central and South America.

The piece depicts three states of being, leaving the viewer to question if this is three perspectives of the same object or whether it represents three emotional states in a given space and time, or indeed, whether this is a reference to the indigenous view of time as circular, where each episode of life is a repetition of a former moment and a precursor of the future.

Like Plin’s street work, the piece strips away the artifice of ego, leaving the viewer facing the primal essence within us all.  The powerful figure conjures the notion of the spirit totem which protects the keeper from evil and evokes the concept of the community Shaman who exists at once, in all times, states of consciousness and places.

With this piece, the exhibition summons and includes both threatened indigenous communities and mankind’s ancestors and future generations.

 

616

Like that of Monsù Plin, the work of UK artist, 616, evokes tribal and indigenous memory from the collective unconscious.

 

"Just sometimes you have to paint inside the box" © by 616. Photo by Tania D Campbell

“Just sometimes you have to paint inside the box” © by 616. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

Repetition of line hypnotizes the viewer and leaves one unable to discern the origins of the patterns from any particular culture.  The art suggests African, Polynesian, South American and Aboriginal tribal markings and speaks to the commonality of symbolic language found around the globe.

 

"Where's Your F**cking Tool" © by 616. Photo by Tania D Campbell

“Where’s Your F**cking Tool” © by 616. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

With a subtle witticism characteristic of the works of 616, the painting on handsaw reminds us that for all our technical advancement and urban amenities, we are all still essentially cave dwellers who have evolved little from our leap of advancement: the hand tool.

The unspecified origin of the markings coupled with the reminder of our origins confirms our membership in a single tribe: Mankind.

 

Pyramid Oracle

In his own 3-faced piece, spirituality and transformation are central themes of the art of New York based artist, Pyramid Oracle.  “Evocations Revolve” infuses the show with an otherworldly spirit that is characteristic of  the artist’s street pieces.

 

"Evocations Revolve" © by Pyramid Oracle, photo by Tania D Campbell

“Evocations Revolve” © by Pyramid Oracle, photo by Tania D Campbell

 

The surrealism of the piece seems to call forth a dream from the collective unconsciousness which binds all of humanity in a community of image and myth.   Like Pyramid Oracle’s street pieces, “Evocations Revolve” highlights our struggle to maintain the veneer of an unchanging yet false story of the meaning of “reality”.

The man’s face is weathered, wild and weary, and one face melts into the next. Two faces gaze directly at the viewer, while the central one gazes heavenward, drawing our attention to the unseen. It is this unseen essence that links each to the community of souls.  And, it is this, which lies just beyond our cognition, which seems to infuse light into Pyramid Oracle’s weathered faces, filling them with their profound beauty.

As in many of his works, Pyramid Oracle celebrates the sacred in what we have otherwise discarded – the elderly and the poor.  In seeing them thus restored, the viewer participates in welcoming the marginalised back into “community.”

 

Captain Kris, SpZero76 and The Real Dill

The theme of myth, legend and collective need for meaning is echoed by artists like Captain Kris, SpZero76, and the Real Dill whose character based artwork takes us into the world of storytelling.

 

image

Top: “Flailing Limbs” © Captain Kris Bottom: (Left) “Painting the Town” © by SpZero76, (Right) “Untitled” by The Real Dill Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

The style, associated with comics, ‘zines and graphic novels throughout the world, expresses the need for myth and joins a tradition dating to ancient times where symbolic language and image helped define ourselves, our gods, heroes, and communities, through storytelling.

It is through our stories that mankind has handed down our histories and linked successive generations to their ancestors.

 

Saki and Bitches

Like ‘zines, which are sometimes sexually explicit and associated with bawdy humour, Saki and Bitches presents voluptuous and sensuous women in poses and situations one might associate with the male gaze and erotica. Rather than objectify these women, the viewer is challenged to integrate the image of raw feminine sexuality.

 

Art © by Saki and Bitches, Photo by Tania D Campbell

“Erika” © by Saki and Bitches, Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

In a similar way to Captain Kris, SpZero76 and the Real Dill, these works – whether on the street or inside the cover of ‘zines – reclaim the repressed shadow side of our collective unconsciousness as a part of our heroic visions of ourselves.

As a community of mankind, we are made whole by being able to witness these projections of our baser instincts and to accept them as part of ourselves.

 

Skeleton Cardboard

With a stylistic nod to late New York Street Artist, Basquiat, Skeleton Cardboard’s style of paint and drawing on reclaimed and found objects adds a further international flavour to the show.

 

"No photos on the dance floor Plz" © by Skeleton Cardboard. Photo by Tania D Campbell

“No photos on the dance floor Plz” © by Skeleton Cardboard. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

Like Basquiat, Skeleton Cardboard uses social commentary as a springboard to deeper truths about the individual in society through dichotomies such as wealth versus poverty, connection versus disconnection, and self awareness versus self image. Skeleton Cardboard’s art challenges and dismantles our assumptions of the good life. His merry skeletons seem blissfully unaware that they are dead, just as a culture of media munching, socially networked individuals have forgotten how to think independently and to connect to one another.

 

"No wifi, Can't breathe" © by Skeleton Cardboard. photo by Tania D Campbell

“No wifi, Can’t breathe” © by Skeleton Cardboard. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

A darker view of community is communicated. Yet, by holding up a mirror to society, Skeleton Cardboard’s work offers an alternative way forward to connection.

The marriage of image with text and symbols, drawing, and painting, goes well beyond the heyday of graffiti in New York, evoking ancient and prehistoric times and reminds us that we are, indeed, a link in the DNA chain of a mankind struggling to form and maintain structures of clan, tribe and community.

 

Fanakapan

UK artist, Fanakapan has long worked with the dichotomy of innocence and violence, with his balloon and candy characters that evoke memories of our own childhoods.  Sometimes playful and joyous and sometimes violent and macabre, his works challenge viewers to consider the ways in which we gloss over uncomfortable truths and sometimes re-invent “false memories” of happier times.

 

image

Inflatable horse children of the apocalypse © by Fanakapan. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

Whether the “Inflatable horse children of the apocalypse” series encourages us to throw off the veils of illusion of the re-invented childhoods that we, as adults, have used to cope with our pasts, or indeed whether we are meant to be encouraged to live our short lives to the fullest, one thing is certain: Fanakapan conveys the one universal truth which links all of mankind – the inevitability that birth is always chased by death.

 

Otto Schade

Death looms in much of the work of Chilean born artist, Otto Schade.  “Extreme Fishing”  is part of the artist’s oeuvre which focuses on the dichotomy between innocence (or ignorance) and violence at the societal level.

"Extreme Fishing" © by Otto Schade. Photo by Tania D Campbell

“Extreme Fishing” © by Otto Schade. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

Familiar images of children at play are disrupted, as weapons – most often weapons of war – replace familiar objects of play.  The children continue playing, ignorant of the deadly nature of the game.

Otto Schade challenges the viewer to question the way in which we have come to see war as a game.  We have become desensitized to the brutality of killing, from playing violent and realistic virtual war games and from accepting the convoluted and dispassionate language of the killing machinery of modern warfare.  The death of a human being is described as as a “win” when an enemy is killed (“target acquired”) and as a “clerical error” when our own soldiers die (“collateral damage”).

The artist confronts the viewer with the blood on our own hands as we turn a blind eye to the reality of the game.  In “Extreme Fishing” the gun that is hooked by the boy’s fishing line points towards the boy.   Death is a moment away, and calls into question the very future of humanity if we fail to stop playing the game.

 

Illuzina

The future of humanity is called into question as well in Illuzina’s piece, “Gaia”.  In the piece, the mother goddess, Gaia, is represented with reference to images of early feminism, particularly the black lesbian feminist who was, for a long time, marginalised in a movement that had been dominated by the perspective of white middle class, Northern privilege.

 

"Gaia" © by Illuzina. Photo by Tania D Campbell

“Gaia” © by Illuzina. Photo by Tania D Campbell

 

The painting portrays woman as a powerful agent and offers positive racial and queer imagery.  Referencing the 1970s Black Exploitation genre of Northern cinema, it also calls forth and embraces the global South which has been exploited by the global North for her natural resource riches.

It is the obsession with excessive consumption in the North which has already triggered unpredictable and destructive impacts of man-made climate change.  The global South, with its inability to adapt to these changes, stands to suffer most.

Despite historical geo-politics, we are reminded that the population of the global South constitutes the majority of mankind.  The work not only gives prominence to the South in planetary dialogue but positions the planet as the centre of the discourse.

Illuzina’s work reminds us that there is no future for the community of mankind if we destroy the planet. If She dies, we all die, and we will all join the voices of our ancestors in a community of the dead.

Yet, the piece offers hope.  Gaia sits in a state of potential – unplugged and disconnected to her power.

The message of the piece, and perhaps an underlying theme in much of the Street Art in the Underhand exhibition is this: the marginalised are the majority.  This majority, once awakened and connected to their power as a community, can create positive social, environmental, political and spiritual change.

 

Many other talented artists not already mentioned have outstanding works in the show, making this exhibition well worth the visit.

Underhand runs at BSMT Space until 21 September.