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Oneness

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Into the 4th Year…

August 28, 2017

Photo: Melanie Magdalena

As we enter our 4th year of Gratitude Practice, a word of Thanks….

On the 20th of August, we marked the 3rd year of this gratitude practice.  In prior years, I’ve looked back at what we’ve achieved, but this has not been an easy year for me.  I have to admit that I’ve struggled to stay positive and to be grateful.  Depression, panic, and anger  have been my companions as much as gratitude, joy, and oneness.  I’ve been stuck in my own pain more than I have been able to serve, it seems.  And, because its been such a difficult year to keep that balance a positive one, our anniversary passed, without me noticing it.

But, as much as I – and maybe you – have struggled with a personal or professional life that have been painfully disappointing and faced, every day, the darkening of the world news, we have stayed the course and we deserve to celebrate that.

I have always said that I am personally most inspired by moments of gratitude found in the darkest hour.  And frankly life is always a dance with adversity as much as it is with ease and joy.  We started this journey of gratitude on Facebook when I was terribly ill.  Daily gratitude practice helped me to overcome that challenge and to inspire others.  Internal challenges are not as cut and dried and progress as easy to see as when it is when the issue is physical.  I understand that.  And yet, we are still here.

We are all still here!

I have learned that frequent practice is essential in difficult times.  During the year, I returned to a daily practice on Facebook, with friends, and I’m sorry that I was not in a place to be able to write publicly as much as I would have wished I could.  Most of us are not able to give our best when we are struggling and I urge you to go gently with yourselves in your own times of sorrow.

I have also learned that grief is a lonely place.

I have faced judgement for being depressed or angry or for experiencing anxiety this year.  Not for the experience itself, but because it stretched on too long for the patience of others.  When someone dies, people are, for example, sympathetic for the first week following the loss.  But compassion fades.  From experience, those who are in touch with their loss and their emotions surrounding loss do not generally get over it within a week, or even a year.  It is usually that second week, second month,  and second year that is the loneliest for those who are struggling to put their life together again after the shock of a loss.  When one has truly grieved a loss, life will never, ever be the same again.

I never aimed to create a saccharine site where all we did was write ‘It’s all good,’ and then stuffed our suffering down into the depths of our souls where it could ferment and cause illness.  To me, the most meaningful offering I can give to others is to say ‘My life is difficult and I’m feeling awful and I can’t seem to want to get out of bed.  But I’m working these tools of gratitude (and joy, oneness and service to find meaning and purpose) all with faith that this low moment will pass.’  I invite you to witness as much of my journey as I can bear to reveal and you can bear to witness, so that you will know that you are not the only one who sometimes struggles with loss and grief and anger and panic that seems will never end.  I applaud anyone – including myself – for trying each day to apply the tools, even when it feels impossible.

I will never judge you for your grief.  Instead, I hope that you will find a place of solace, here.

Let us never use our commitment to these practices to shame one another for not doing as well at our work as someone thinks we should be doing, or for having difficult and dark emotions or for cursing or otherwise behaving imperfectly in times of distress.  We know when we are not doing as much as we wish we could.  We are all doing the best that we can.  I will never judge you for trying and falling down on your gratitude practice.  I will, if only by example, try my very best to encourage you to keep getting back up again when life sucks so hard you don’t know where to turn.

Fall 9,999 times; Get  up 10,000 times.

Together, we WILL make Ten Thousand Days of Gratitude.

 

As I do each year, I re-affirm my commitment to living a grateful life through 10,000 days spent observing that for which I am grateful, and making my life one of service to life itself, living a life of joy, from a sense of purpose, and of Oneness experienced through the awe of nature, art and spirituality.

I will tell my story of this journey because I believe that storytelling is how life’s meaning is revealed.  And I invite you to share your stories, in the comments, in an interview or in some new – as yet unknown manner – because it is in mutual sharing that community is forged and a new culture of grateful living can spread.

I’m grateful to readers who have stayed the course with me, through the dark times of winter and the strange and curious death and rebirth that is currently in process.  And I’m grateful to all who have shared their stories with us over these past three years.

I acknowledge and remember the friends and loved ones we’ve lost this past year.

And, I am truly thankful for another trip around the sun, together.  I look forward to our 4th year…

 

Photo: Joshua Fuller

For what are you most grateful?

Articles, Nature, Oneness

Making Every Day, Earth Day: Working with Oneness

June 8, 2016
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Photo by NASA

Not long ago, we celebrated another Earth Day. For many of us, marking Earth Day demonstrates that we care about the environment, however, setting aside one day per year for Earth Day or Women’s Day or Mother’s Day always sits uncomfortably with me.  I feel that as long as we need a special day of remembrance, we are not fully integrated with Feminine energy, caregiving, or the Earth.  And, on a practical level, there is a danger that attending an event on the given day may generate the good vibes of actually making a contribution, while our behaviour has not changed at all.

On Earth Day, an artist that I follow posted to his social media account a woodcut print that he had made.

 

 

Like the images in the print, he made an impassioned plea to his social media followers to rethink their values and consumption patterns.  He ended his plea with: “Every Day Should Be Earth Day.”  He isn’t the first person to have said this, but he does not seem to use words lightly, so when he speaks, I pay attention, and I think about what he has said.  Over the next few days, I thought a lot about it.

What would it take to truly make every day, Earth Day?

Behavioural change, is needed, to be sure. And so, I set about developing something that, as a sustainability consultant, was within my reach:  A series on ecological issues and behavioural changes that we could all make to help address the issues.  I completed and edited and polished the first article.  But I couldn’t publish.  I knew something fundamental was missing.  It wasn’t the first article, after all.

I needed to get out of my comfortable position of understanding, in order to begin at the beginning.

At the heart of  behavioural change must be a real shift in consciousness and an awakening to the insanity of our apparent indifference to the consequences of our lifestyles.  That awakening would seem to require a deep reverence for the Earth and clarity on what we are doing to destroy her.  I am not saying that we should not reduce and eliminate the use of plastics, switch to clean energy, grow our own food, reduce water and embedded water use and avoid the use of conflict minerals like Coltan, found in electronics.  But I do believe that we must begin with a perceptual shift toward the interconnectedness of all things: Oneness.

Those of you who have navigated around this website will notice that I have not completed the article on Oneness.  I have deliberately left it blank, for now.  I have been writing for nearly two years about Oneness as we each develop our own understanding and meaning.

There are many great thinkers who have had something to say about the concept:

 

“Oneness is very simple: everything is included and allowed to live according to its true nature. This is the secret that is being revealed, the opportunity that is offered. How we make use of this opportunity depends upon the degree of our participation, how much we are prepared to give ourselves to the work that needs to be done, to the freedom that needs to be lived.”

— Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee from the book Working with Oneness

“From out of all the many particulars comes oneness, and out of oneness come all the many particulars.”

— Heraclitus

“A human being is part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. We experience ourselves, our thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest. A kind of optical delusion of consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from the prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. The true value of a human being is determined primarily by the measure and the sense in which they have obtained liberation from the self. We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if humanity is to survive.”

— Albert Einstein

 

We require a paradigm shift.

Last month, we celebrated North American Mother’s Day. There is meant to be no greater bond between humans than that of the bond between child and primary caregiver, regardless of gender or biological relationship. Our first relationship, with “Mother,” is an archetypal one.  It is, for better or worse, a relationship that defines us.  Yet we seem to have forgotten that our first Mother is the Earth.  Connecting to Oneness may help our remembrance of her and to re-establish and work with our archetypal relationship with the primary caregiver of us all.

Of course, when we begin to do this, if we are truly witnessing what is happening, we cannot help but feel overwhelming pain.  As horrible as it is, perhaps the grief of “witnessing” is a sign that we are on the right path.

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, one of the Interfaith leaders dedicated to Working With Oneness offers a brief talk on our current ecological crisis, in this 7 minute film.

 

I understand that not everyone reading this will resonate with the concept of magic.  However, it is useful to note that Vaughan-Lee is not only a mystic but a Jungian psychologist.  I don’t pretend to understand the depths of Jungian analysis, but I have some knowledge.  Perhaps we can consider this destructive entrancement as a kind of strangle hold on our collective unconsciousness.  We need a paradigm shift to break free; It seems, to me, that the first step toward that paradigm shift is in working with Oneness.

So, how can we work with Oneness?

In whatever way is natural to you, every single day.  I came to my own understanding and practice of Oneness through a spark that was lit by Llewellyn Vaughn-Lee and the Interfaith leaders of Working With Oneness.  I am not an expert in Oneness – I struggle as much as anyone to work with it, every day.  However, there are many experts on many spiritual paths which take up the practice, even if not so named.  And, Einstein shows that shifting to working with Oneness is not the preserve of the mystic or the spiritual aspirant.  For the secular among us, an association with a group of like minded people who care about the planet, and who practice compassion towards all living beings, can help us connect and work with Oneness.

For the spiritual seeker, I suggest looking to your own path to see how Oneness with the planet is called to manifest.  If you practice healing, perhaps make it a regular part of your practice to send healing to the planet and to the soul of the planet – the Anima Mundi. If you are a meditator, yogi or have some other spiritual practice, dedicate at least some of your practice to healing the planet. In your remembrances of the Divine Quantum, remember that Divine Life that is Mother Earth.

Working with Oneness will, no doubt, bring us in touch with grief as we witness what is.  It is a terrible burden that is necessary for the transformation that can lead to the creation of a new story.

If you are an artist, writer, or musician, connect with, and start to tell not just the story of destruction and crisis, but the new story of Life.  How?  However you can.  All art originates from storytelling and heroic tales.  We are all on a heroic journey through the dark night of the soul – now, it is no longer just our own soul, but the soul of the planet, as well.  We must make this journey alone, but with the knowledge that we are together, in this darkness, with one another and our Mother Earth.  Like the hero, we must find the light in the darkness that leads us to the other side, or else, we risk being lost.  Too much grief can dim the creative light and energy in us all, if we don’t also work to midwife the new story of Life.

If you are not an artist, writer or musician – create, anyway!   Create a community garden, draw a picture of a tree, tell a story from the point of view of an animal, sing a song when you go for a walk.  I come from the West coast of Canada.  When hiking, it is advisable to wear a bell to warn bears that a human is approaching and to avoid a startled and possibly dangerous meeting.  I don’t wear a bear bell; I sing.  I’m pretty sure I’m not in key, but do the birds worry about being in key?  They just sing.  Rebirth is a creative process; Let’s generate as much creative energy as we can.

Let’s spend more time in and develop a new relationship with nature.  Let’s reflect on the wonder of the natural world and how we have not only taken her for granted, but destroyed her with our forgetfulness.  Let’s learn to listen with our intuition, our imagination and our hearts to the story she wants to tell, and to our role in the narrative.  Let’s  reflect on the food chain at each meal and reflect upon what has gone into bringing this food to our supermarket, our kitchen and our table.  Reflection on this may lead to an understanding of our own role in creating the toxins poisoning our Mother Earth and finding its way into our food and it may help make conscious the ways in which we are creating and exacerbating drought conditions around the planet with our consumption patterns.  It may lead us to switch from fossil fuels, eliminate plastic waste and grow our own food in a community garden, as we care gently for our Mother Earth.

There are so many ways to work with Oneness and discovering the way that is right for each of us is part of our own individual part of the story.

Behavioural change is crucial for our survival.  But a more important change must come if we are to avoid patching up a system built upon a paradigm that is fundamentally broken and unsustainable.  If we really work with Oneness, we all must accept responsibility for our part in the current ecological crisis that comes from recognising we are one with the story of destruction as well as the story of creative healing that is required.

In the coming months, we will look at ways we can change our behaviour and our ethos around various issues.  For me, as much as anyone else, it will also be a venture into the unknown world of working with Oneness with Mother Earth.

If there is an issue you feel strongly about, or if you’d like to write an article, a poem or feature some artwork related to the topic, contact us.

Let’s make some magic.